SOUTH OF THE BORDERJUST A STONE’S THROW AWAY

From THE EARTH TIMES:

Parishioners at Vision in Action, a church in the northern Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez, have known for seven months the price of the life of their pastor and the survival of the mental hospital he runs: 2,000 dollars a month. In Ciudad Juarez, just across the US border from El Paso, Texas, religious institutions are no different from restaurants, bars, funeral homes, butcher shops and used-car dealers, who risk being the targets of arson if they fail to pay their "dues."

"They have chased some 60 evangelical pastors away from the city," says Vision in Action pastor Jose Antonio Galvan, 60, sitting in his office.

"They have had relatives killed for not paying, and others have opted to pay, 100 dollars per week and up."

He did not have enough money to pay and fled to the United States, but returned three months ago.

"I couldn't be speaking about faith in the United States if I cannot make you believe that the bigger your problem, the bigger your faith should be," Galvan says. "Now, in Juarez, one is dancing with death, death hugs you, loves you, and if God stipulates that I shall be killed, I shall die."

In 2009, there were 2,650 slayings linked to organized crime in the city, despite the deployment of more than 8,000 soldiers and 2,000 federal agents, according to local business people. Across Mexico, the daily El Universal estimates the number of deaths linked to organized crime in 2009 at more than 7,700.

On Wednesday, Mexicans celebrated the Epiphany. Central Panificadora, a bakery, usually donates a huge roll, traditional for the feast, for hundreds of low-income Juarenses to partake of in a park, but it was attacked for the third time for refusing to pay extortion. The celebrations were cancelled.

But on the other hand, although this does not excuse the evil of the drug traffickers and extortionists, there may be an element of "you reap what you so" in the above story, as it applies to evangelicals and Roman Catholics.

From YAHOO NEWS:

Christian groups have said said they had asked Mexico's attorney general to overturn a newly-voted Mexico City law allowing gay marriage and the possibility of adoption. The Contraternice group of Evangelical churches and the College of Catholic Lawyers said they believed the new law that "allows marriage between people of the same sex and the possibility to adopt" was unconstitutional, a statement said.

The complaint was based on "Christian principles," but also included legal issues on which the Supreme Court should decide, including possible violations of the Constitution and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, it added.

COMMENT: "You pay us or we'll burn your business down." "You do what we say or we'll excommunicate you." Both statements involve the bullying of the weak by the strong.

Comments

SOUTH OF THE BORDERJUST A STONE’S THROW AWAY — 2 Comments

  1. RE: your comment

    Yes. Yes it does. And for what it’s worth, that’s something that Joe has no patience for. It does seem to be popping up in all kinds of strange places these days…