WHERE SOME CHURCHES LEADOTHERS JUST STUMBLE

From THE BBC:

At the World Youth Day in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn launched an online marketing campaign. The campaign includes new mobile apps, augmented reality gadgets such as prayer coins with a GPS tracking system, pilgrimage planning tools, and more conventional prayer sites. The Brooklyn Diocese attracted national attention this year with an ad campaign dubbing Jesus Christ the “original hipster”. The same creative office is now experimenting with online projects in the hope of attracting young people to the Catholic faith.


Comments

WHERE SOME CHURCHES LEADOTHERS JUST STUMBLE — 2 Comments

  1. This ring a bell! During the time I worked for the RC church, new music was a big feature of the new Mass. I loved the fact that much of it was based on scripture and it was fresh and CONTEMPORARY despite the shivers and pain filled howls of many.
    When I first had a computer I found a web site with traditional Episcopal hymns – music, lyrics AND pics of the persons who wrote those hymns. Mostly male, stern, and bewhiskered- page after page of them! The lyrics filled with ‘thee s and thou s’! Yes, some of them are beautiful but often triumphal and heavy. Why I ask, why?? Why update the liturgy and drag these fearsome songs along? When I ask, ever so politely, People seem to fall into fury that ends the conversation.
    I once tutored a child who had been adopted into a RC family. She was loving and bright and we loved working with her. She was to be baptized at a Mass and I begged the Organist to play Carry Lander’s “Song of baptism”:
    “See this child before you Lord, You who gave her life, keep her in your heart, Lord, now and all her days.” ( approximate words). Instead, he thundered out with “The Church’s One Foundation”. It had little to do with what was happening and it led me to wonder if some organists even try to link the music to real life!
    nij

    or

  2. That technique (iPod w hymns) would certainly work for me!

    [OK, OK, I’m not a “youth” (except in maturity levels)]