ONCE A BARBARIAN ALWAYS A BARBARIAN

The bloody Vikings are at it again. In Norway, the government has agreed to allow officially licensed psychopaths to kill 157 cats this year. There are only about 470 elusive lynxes in Norway, one of the world's most underpopulated countries, and yet the human inhabitants find it impossible to share it with the wildlife who were there before they arrived. It's not as if they eat the cats as Norwegians live on a diet of open fish sandwiches and nothing else.

Meanwhile in Sweden a hunter has the audacity to complain that being attacked by a bear his dog had just woken up from hibernation was like "a slaughterhouse." Yes, well now he knows what it feels like to be an inedible, furry non-human in Scandinavia. The bear has been duly punished for being disturbed by a man intent on killing him. Police gave orders for the bear to be tracked and killed, and the municipality’s specialist hunter with the help of local hunting teams succeeded to fell him on Sunday.

Here's a photo of the dead bear which will now never wake up from hibernation ever again. Human beings are bastards.

Comments

ONCE A BARBARIAN ALWAYS A BARBARIAN — 12 Comments

  1. My grandfather was a Norwegian immigrant. Fortunately, he did not pass on any “kill the animals” genes, just his stubbornness.
    God, why don’t you stop us?

  2. The tragic irony is that the Norwegian government has a ordered a massive culling of the reindeer population. Evidently there aren’t enough large, natural predators left to keep their population in check. I wonder fecking why!!!

  3. Changes in hunting laws in my neck of the woods have resulted in an increase in bear and cougar (aka, puma, mountain lion) population and human/critter encounters. So far, the thinking of residents has been in regards to our encroaching on animal habitat vs. the other way around. I could spit nails, however, when pet owners call for eliminating coyotes, as if that were possible, because the owner wasn’t bright enough to keep their cat or little dog safe. I know the same will happen when an encounter with one of the bigger critters goes terribly wrong, likely largely in part due to the lack of sense on the part of the human (Though that may not necessarily be true in regards to a passing jogger whose very act says to Mr. Cougar, “Come hither!”).

  4. Particularly for the grizzly. In all seriousness, the brown bear is practically non-existant in Washington State, but efforts are being made to encourage their return to the North Cascades, largely protected State and Federal lands. The black bear, in contrast, is ubiquitous.

  5. You are being very naughty whilst I’m putting on my environmental serious face!

    Indeed, I have had the many opportunities to see the wild AND domesticated black bear, but before I leave this terrestrial orb I hope to see the return of the grizzly and wolves to the North Cascades. The wolves are on their way!

  6. I have encountered both wolves and black bears in Northern forests. Neither they nor I suffered any injury, in large part because we all used our brains. I hope to see them again. I have watched a fox check our campsite for leftovers, and a wolverine pass through.

    If I thought I could serve my family while doing it, I would move to the edge of a Northern wilderness in a heart beat. The trick is to remember it is the wolves and other wild things that can claim it as ancestral land.

    FWIW
    jimB

  7. Well, if I’m to believe all the films I’ve seen about your backwoods, it’s the inbred, cannibalistic, human natives that you have to watch out for not the wildlife.

  8. LOL! No, not in the North Country so much. They do not like the cold.

    In Wisconsin of all places you have to fear some of the Vietnamese whose families came here after we lost the war. And there are some tribal issues between the local tribal folks, Chippewa mostly, and the whites over hunting and fishing rules.

    I am a lover not a fighter. I do not have much in the way of issues. I follow the most restrictive fishing rules and do not concern myself with what others do. And while I can for sure shoot (expert with a pistol, nearly that good with a rifle, and improving with a bow) I do not hunt unless hungry. On the other hand, I do not look like prey to another human.

    I think you are seeing movies about the other parts of the place. We are a big country. 🙂

  9. The English (and I expect every other free nation on earth) spend most evenings watching films and TV programmes of Americans killing each other in bizarre and cruel ways. The rest of the world doesn’t hate you – they are just scared stiff of you. Hollywood has sold you worldwide as a nation of homicidal maniacs. It amazes me that none of my readers have been gunned downed in the street yet. If TV is anything to go by there can’t be many people left in Los Angeles.