MADPRIEST’S QUESTION OF THE DAY

I am an avid fan of cop dramas and detective programmes on TV and Mrs MP is a sucker for hospital dramas. In real life police stations and hospitals do the bosses get away with shouting at and being downright rude to the lower ranks without being told where to get off, sued for harassment and bullying or simply smacked in the face?

Comments

MADPRIEST’S QUESTION OF THE DAY — 25 Comments

  1. In the hospital in which I worked early in my career, the likes of House wouldn’t have lasted a month, and the Grey’s Anatomy crew would have been unable to fund their positions due to all the free time they spend whining about the corridors. Degree of angst is not included in productivity reports.

    It’s the lawyer shows that catch my fancy, with The Good Wife being the best of the best – Love that gorgeous, well-dressed, Alicia and her cute little nemesis, well-dressed, Cary.

  2. Oooh, he is sooo good-looking.

    A nurse in our local hospital sued a bad-tempered surgeon, who terrorized the OR staff for years. She won a settlement, and the doc was ordered to attend anger-management classes. Good for her.

    WV: yawnsh. The post or the comment?

  3. I doubt that the yelling in Police Departments happens much in real life, MP, unless you can count the times that perps have been mistreated by Cops. . . I have heard complaints of Nurses being belittled by Doctors. I don’t think that’s as prevalent as it used to be when Docs thought they were God.

    Yes, Mimi, good for her!!

  4. I think he rather looks like a nasty bishop myself…are you sure it isn’t from that church crime drama show where the bishop throws curates and vicars up against the wall in his office and threatens them if they don’t start shaking down their congregatins for more money?

  5. I used to watch that show, the one the face, above, is on, religiously. I really liked it. But not so much now. And I do not like the star’s new look – It’s not so much the scowl, he always had that, but that hair! What gives with that hair?! (and of course I forget his name and the name of the show)

  6. Speaking as an aging person, Lois, I think his look is different because he’s aging. He also appears to have lost weight, so more wrinkles show. 😉

    I liked the show he did that was set in an African country. That’s the one I base his different look on. I don’t think I’ve seen this one.

  7. Doctors might not get away with yelling at nurses anymore (good) but no one gives a damn if they berate the clerical and support staffs (of which I was one, for a long time).

  8. It’s called “Waking The Dead,” Lois. It was the cold case series that begat all the others. We have just watched the last episode of the last ever series here in the UK.

  9. Yes! That’s it – Waking the Dead. I loved it! Actually, his face doesn’t look that different – he always scowled. It’s that kind of upsweep to the hair that reminds me of one of those young Dr. Who’s so I think, “what’s up with that?”. I personally have those bags under the eyes. No amount of sleep seems to help.

    but thank you, MP and Mimi for helping my fading memory!

  10. I work at a hospital, and NJP’s comment is pretty much spot-on. We also get a fair number of bad tempered managers on the administrative side (mine not amongst them, thank the Lord).

    Management practices here seem to be at least 10-15 years behind the times (a lot of autocratic managers, very hierarchical structure, etc…)

  11. I was a cop for 30 years and served under a number of tough guv’nors who were not averse to colourful language and what amounts, these days, to verbal abuse. That said, when the chips were down and you faced all sorts of threats, they’d be the first to stand by you. Furthermore, most of them were darn good coppers who helped keep our streets safe. Today, when faced with malicious, unfounded allegations of misconduct, the modern bobby has to undergo a complaints procedure that is generally weighted in favour of the complainer.
    As for shouting and being ‘rude’, we used to say, ‘if you can’t take it you shouldn’t have joined!’. Is it just me, or are people too sensitive these days??

  12. Being abusive is fine as long as you allow abuse in return. Being abusive and then disciplining someone for answering back is just plain bullying and cowardly.

  13. Butt out, Mimi. This is man talk. We are on about life on the shop floor. When I had a real job there was always a lot of verbal to and fro between the workers. It was all good fun. But if a boss insults his workers without allowing them to have a go back at him then that is not on.

  14. Well, it’s a real education for me then. Why should I butt out if I learn something new? I saw the movie, “Gran Torino”, you know.

    And at the age of 16 I worked at a real job in an attic or basement putting price tags on clothes, and women can be vicious with words, too.

    The reason I can’t say whether it was an attic or basement is because I used an elevator (lift) to get there. All I remember is that whether it was up or down, it was a God-forsaken place.

  15. But when women are vicious with words, they mean it.

    MadPriest, master of the sweeping statement, it ain’t necessarily so, nor is it so that men never mean their vicious words. 🙂

  16. Well, I’ve only got my own experience to go from. So, I have to accept that maybe women only mean their vicious words when they are talking to men.

    Anyway, women are far crueller when they argue. They can get very spiteful and personal. A man’s idea of a good argument tends to consist of, “You’re a wanker,” “No, you’re a wanker.”