COVETING A NEIGHBOUR’S REVOLUTION

The revolution in Egypt has been the top story of all news reports in the UK over the last couple of weeks. We have watched with interest but there has not been any overt excitement about what has been going on. I think we may be taking the attitude that yes, democracy is good, but democracy in an overwhelmingly Islamic country could spell bad news for the Middle East peace process and could even result in more bombs being detonated on our public transport. I don't think anyone here is suggesting that it is right for the West to continue to fund, and, therefore, sustain, the dictatorship in Egypt, but we are worried about what the future may hold.

I have noticed that this is not the case in the U.S.A. Certainly among the liberal minded in the U.S. there has been overwhelming support for the revolutionaries. If anything this fervency has been more intense than the fervency for change before Barack Obama's election to the White House.

This is interesting. The citizens of the U.S.A. are not normally this interested in events outside the borders of their own country, even when they are taking place in countries they are at war with. I don't think the obsession with Egypt's internal politics has anything to do with American pride in and support for democracy. In fact, I think the opposite may be true. It does seem to me that there may be a sizeable dollop of envy involved the American enthusiasm for change in Egypt. The shooting in Tucson recently, caused by the hate campaigns of the U.S. right wing, has shown that although democracy in the U.S. is not dead it is certainly considerably unwell at the moment. Perhaps my American friends' emotional investment in the political situation in Egypt indicates that they, also, would really love to take to the streets and demand a just, transparent and actually representative democratic process in their own country.

Comments

COVETING A NEIGHBOUR’S REVOLUTION — 5 Comments

  1. “…although democracy in the U.S. is not dead it is certainly considerably unwell at the moment.”

    Yes.

    And yes, at least for me, I have definitely experienced envy. I wish we would take to the streets. But I don’t think the so-called “average American” has suffered enough yet. We may not be doing very well in the bread department but we’re still well supplied with circuses.

  2. democracy in an overwhelmingly Islamic country could spell bad news for the Middle East peace process and could even result in more bombs being detonated on our public transport

    Couldn’t disagree more.

    Terrorism occurs when democracy is SQUELCHED, not liberated. [What Malcolm X said almost 50 years ago is STILL true: “the ballot or the bullet”. Yes, yes: in the US, we get both. {Sigh}]

    The Biggest Loser in Egypt, besides Mubarak, is Al Qaida!

  3. Ah yes, the “hate campaigns of the Right” and the all caring left…
    I mean, just look at the Occupy Wall Street movement:
    The revolution will be fed, but the food may soon be cut back and might not be as tasty.
    It looks like the grub served to the Wall Street Occupiers will go from gourmet to gruel tomorrow in an effort to shoo away “professional homeless” people who have been feasting on the Occupiers’ donated dimes.
    That’s right. The freeloading Occupiers are angry at all the random freeloading going on down in Zuccotti Park.
    The grub down at Zuccotti has been written up in the past for exceeding expectations with its quality and variety.
    Some out-of-work chefs have joined the ranks of the Occupiers, which clearly kicked the cuisine up a notch. But the OWS kitchen staff has had enough of feeding the homeless and random hangers-on.
    “We need to limit the amount of food we’re putting out to curb the influx of derelicts,” a kitchen volunteer told the New York Post. Another volunteer said the cooks felt “overworked and under-appreciated” and worked 16-hour days.
    It’s almost like the young Marxists want to be compensated for their labor!
    Starting Friday, Zuccotti’s own top chefs will switch out their organic chicken, spaghetti bolognese, and roasted beet salads for brown rice gruel.
    The plan is to change the menu for three days and hope that the “criminals and vagrants disperse.” At that point, the Occupiers may starting whipping up their artisan treats again. If the unwanted false-Occupiers don’t leave, it may be nothing but tasteless porridge and brown rice for the foreseeable future.
    But since the story hit the papers, the Occupiers have denied that there plan is to “starve out vagrants.” Instead, the cooks claim they just need a few days to rest and get organized.
    Either way, don’t head down to Zuccoti Park anytime soon for the cuisine.