YOUR GOOD NEWS OR GOD’S GOOD NEWS?

Lesley has posted a question on her
blog today, "WHAT IS THE GOSPEL?"

It strikes me that a high proportion of Christians believe the "good news" to be claims made by theologians well after Christ's ministry on earth. Such statements as "Christ died for our sins" are human interpretations of the Christ event.

Personally, I believe the good news is that which was preached by Jesus and recorded in the Gospels. After years of thinking about it I have come to the conclusion that the Gospel can, therefore, be summed up as follows:

God is very close to us and God loves us. So, be nice to one another and, in the end, everything will turn out fine.

It's a bit simple, I know. But, then, so am I.

Comments

YOUR GOOD NEWS OR GOD’S GOOD NEWS? — 22 Comments

  1. It strikes me that a high proportion of Christians believe the “good news” to be claims made by theologians well after Christ’s ministry on earth. Such statements as “Christ died for our sins” are human interpretations of the Christ event.

    Exactly!

    You know, I spent a good deal of my life buying into the party line that you had to have someone to interpret, but, really, why not me interpreting for me? All the epistles and writings of the Church Fathers are mere commentary by men no less fallible, no more wise, and far less knowledgeable about most sciences than I. The community around me – now, not 1400 years ago – can help me decide what is and what isn’t a healthy direction for interpretation, and keep me grounded in realization that my interpretation affects those around me, not JUST me.

    You want to get down to Jesus’ actual Good News, it was, “I’m going to send the Spirit upon you to direct each of you and endow you with wisdom.”

  2. I’m with Mark.

    Forget the theologians, the commentators, the epistles, Jesus even. If you want to know what the Good News is, you need know nothing past Luke 2:10-11.

    But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord.

    That’s it. The Good News. You can make it a whole lot more complicated and a whole lot more exclusive but maybe the angel knew what they were talking about.

  3. I don’t watch ‘Supernatural’ but I do watch ‘Being Human’ – now that’s an interesting concept.

    I don’t go for this ‘gospel’ stuff at all, but I don’t mind answering the same question. Trouble is my blog tends to look like it is following Lesley’s around like some dog on heat.

  4. “my blog tends to look like it is following Lesley’s around like some dog on heat.”

    Chin up, Adrian. If there’s no good news then it doesn’t matter, does it?

  5. That simple, eh?

    Seriously?

    I think I know at least one evangelical (maybe even fundamentalist) who would argue this point.

    :sigh:

    He wants to know if I’m this thing called “saved”.

  6. That sort of indicates that you can be unsaved, Tracie. that doesn’t sound like good news. It sounds a bit horrid, to be honest. I suggest you just tell him to fuck off and mind his own business which, slightly altered, is what Jesus said to those who asked him if he was saved.

  7. MP,
    I’ll pick one small theological bone with your statement:

    God is not “very close to us” — God is present among us, and in us.

    This is the essence of the Incarnation, and good, orthodox, Anglican theology.

    (part of the problem of the so-called “orthodox” is that they cannot see the presence of God in others, especially those who are not like them)

  8. No. According to Jesus, God is close, but separate. Of course, God was present with us in Jesus, perhaps. Although Jesus wasn’t that definite about the incarnation, himself.