THE MIDNIGHT JUKEBOX

In my humble, untutored opinion, Isabelle Faust rocks!

I first came across her playing back in 1997 when Harmonia Mundi released an album of Bartok Sonatas performed by her on their Les Nouveaux Interpretes imprint (a series that brought lots of young talent into the spotlight). She is a courageous interpreter of the violin repertoire, especially solo pieces and duets, and she has an edgy, aggressive style that contains an energy that strains at the lead like a pitbull terrier that would cause mayhem if Isabelle was to lose control of it. This appeals to my punk rock sensibilities and is why I think the word "rocks" is an acceptable description.

On the jukebox tonight you will hear J. S. Bach's Partita III (BWV 1006) in E major in its entirety,  taken from the above album released at the end of March this year.

Oh, she is also well cute, which swings it for me every time.

Isabelle's WIKIPEDIA entry.

PURCHASE VIA MADPRIEST'S AMAZON STORE

Comments

THE MIDNIGHT JUKEBOX — 10 Comments

  1. Oh, she is also well cute, which swings it for me every time.

    Funny how we have that in common! 😉

  2. Just knocks my socks off!

    Personally, I prefer a less “edgy” sound in strings. However, she acquits herself (and her approach to sound) magnificently in this performance. It is riveting.

  3. No, I mean early violins that haven’t been ‘improved,’ played by folks that have studied historical performance practices from the time of the composer. Andrew Manze, and Englishman, BTW, is quite good at it.
    Here is his recording of a Biber Sonata that I particularly like.

    Yes, I am quite aware that you were making a joke, but music from an earlier period should be played on instruments from that period, too. It completely changes the affect of the piece upon the listener.

  4. It completely changes the affect of the piece upon the listener. – Yes.

    but music from an earlier period SHOULD be played on instruments from that period, too. – No.

    Unless you also insist the Old Testament is read in ancient Hebrew. I prefer early instruments because they are more punky but I’m no fundie. People can do what they like with music once the composer has sold it to them.

  5. Well, maybe should is the wrong word in this instance. What I meant was that performances of Early music on historical instruments should also be available to the public. I am glad that I live where there are many good early music ensembles perform a lot and can see and hear them live. I envy you because there are many wonderful performers there in England, too. I will say this. I would not walk across a deserted street to see the Tallis Scholars ever again. Although their musicianship is great and I like their recordings, they are dead boring to watch because they seem to be bored themselves.

    I have seen and heard Andrew Manze several times here in California. He is very good.

    Did you click thru to the Biber?

    “People can do what they like with music once the composer has sold it to them.”
    Well, the problem with that is that none of the early composers sold their music to modern players. They can do what they want, but I won’t go. I’m sure there are some that you won’t go to hear either, eh?

  6. She’s splendid, MP!

    Bach didn’t write for early instruments. He wrote for whatever instruments (and choral ensembles) were available to him. He would have loved a good modern piano. Although he would have thought the Mormon Tabernacle Choir was a little over the top.

  7. Beautiful. Gutsy style of playing, as you said, MadPriest.

    I like performances on historical instruments myself and there is happily as Susan says quite a lot of that sort of thing round these parts in the UK.